climateadaptation:

DeSmogBlog is quite biased, but the article is worth checking out. Obama is typically portrayed by lefty and enviro-media as an effective leader with respect to climate change actions. I have on a number of occasions posted on the administrations adaptation and resilience plans and actions.

But, what’s under the radar - what media is ignoring - is that Obama directed his administration to implement very aggressive oil and gas drilling plans formulated under Bush and the oil industry. For example, just last week, Obama opened up the Atlantic coast for offshore drilling.

The Obama administration is reopening the Eastern Seaboard to offshore oil and gas exploration, approving seismic surveys using sonic cannons that can pinpoint energy deposits deep beneath the ocean floor. Via AP

Thus, environmental blogs are missing one half of the story. Check it out…

papress:

Farming Cuba — A new model for cities and countries facing threats to food security brought on by the end of cheap oil

Following the collapse of the Soviet Union in the early 1990s, Cuba found itself solely responsible for feeding a nation that had grown dependent on imports and trade subsidies. Citizens began growing their own organic produce anywhere they could find space, on rooftops, balconies, vacant lots, and even school playgrounds. By 1998 there were more than 8,000 urban farms in Havana producing nearly half of the country’s vegetables. What began as a grassroots initiative had, in less than a decade, grown into the largest sustainable agriculture initiative ever undertaken, making Cuba the world leader in urban farming. Learn more in Farming Cuba: Urban Agriculture from the Ground Up, by Carey Clouse, available now from PAPress.

(via thisbigcity)

fastcompany:

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While they’re making pretty pictures of our city streets, why not hook up some environmental sensors to the Google Street View Cars? These maps will show you where very bad gas leaks are.

Read More>

Cool

(via thisbigcity)

  • Guy on train: I'd fuck you if you didn't have so many tattoos.
  • Me: *turns up music*
  • Guy: I said I'd fuck you if you didn't have so many tattoos!
  • Me: *takes off headphones* Leave. Me. Alone.
  • Guy: Why the fuck do you have so many tattoos?
  • Me:
  • Guy: Are you fucking deaf as well as a piece of trash?
  • Lady by door: Hey. Leave her alone.
  • Guy: Are you her trash girlfriend? Fucking dykes, all tattooed like fucking men. Disgusting waste of pussy.
  • Lady: *moves forward, carefully moves jacket so only I can see the badge on her belt* Are you okay?
  • Me: Fine. Just wish he'd go away.
  • Lady cop: I can make that happen.
  • Guy: Oh, yeah, bitch? Who the fuck are you? I'll kill you!
  • Lady cop: And that's what I was waiting for. *grabs guy, holds him against the door* Harassing women on the train was enough, but you just threatened a cop. You're battin' a thousand tonight.
  • Entire train: *applauds*

nofreedomlove:

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Source

"Image Credit: Carol Rossetti

When Brazilian graphic designer Carol Rossetti began posting colorful illustrations of women and their stories to Facebook, she had no idea how popular they would become. 

Thousands of shares throughout the world later, the appeal of Rosetti’s work is clear. Much like the street art phenomenon Stop Telling Women To Smile, Rossetti’s empowering images are the kind you want to post on every street corner, as both a reminder and affirmation of women’s bodily autonomy. 

"It has always bothered me, the world’s attempts to control women’s bodies, behavior and identities," Rossetti told Mic via email. "It’s a kind of oppression so deeply entangled in our culture that most people don’t even see it’s there, and how cruel it can be."

Rossetti’s illustrations touch upon an impressive range of intersectional topics, including LGBTQ identity, body image, ageism, racism, sexism and ableism. Some characters are based on the experiences of friends or her own life, while others draw inspiration from the stories many women have shared across the Internet. 

"I see those situations I portray every day," she wrote. "I lived some of them myself."

Despite quickly garnering thousands of enthusiastic comments and shares on Facebook, the project started as something personal — so personal, in fact, that Rossetti is still figuring out what to call it. For now, the images reside in albums simply titled “WOMEN in english!" or "Mujeres en español!" which is fitting: Rossetti’s illustrations encompass a vast set of experiences that together create a powerful picture of both women’s identity and oppression.

One of the most interesting aspects of the project is the way it has struck such a global chord. Rossetti originally wrote the text of the illustrations in Portuguese, and then worked with an Australian woman to translate them to English. A group of Israeli feminists also took it upon themselves to create versions of the illustrations in Hebrew. Now, more people have reached out to Rossetti through Facebook and offered to translate her work into even more languages. Next on the docket? Spanish, Russian, German and Lithuanian.

It’s an inspiring show of global solidarity, but the message of Rossetti’s art is clear in any language. Above all, her images celebrate being true to oneself, respecting others and questioning what society tells us is acceptable or beautiful.

"I can’t change the world by myself," Rossetti said. "But I’d love to know that my work made people review their privileges and be more open to understanding and respecting one another."

From the site: All images courtesy Carol Rossetti and used with permission. You can find more illustrations, as well as more languages, on her Facebook page.

My real name is Larissa. Though I identify with Helena more than my namesake here.. Even though very few people have dared to state that I am “too tall” in high heels.. I have always felt awkward regardless being taller than the majority of the men in the room. 

(via cognitivedissonance)

inothernews:

The deforestation of the Amazon rainforest in Brazil by photographer Rodrigo Baleia.  (via the Wall Street Journal)

inothernews:

The deforestation of the Amazon rainforest in Brazil by photographer Rodrigo Baleia.  (via the Wall Street Journal)

(via cognitivedissonance)

cartoonpolitics:

"Child, you have to learn to see things in the right proportions. Learn to see great things great and small things small." .. (Cornelia ten Boom)

cartoonpolitics:

"Child, you have to learn to see things in the right proportions. Learn to see great things great and small things small." .. (Cornelia ten Boom)

(via sensiblestupidity)

plantedcity:

'What do you think our most powerful renewable resource is?' 
This is one of 12 editorial cartoons being considered by the Union of Concerned Scientists in their annual calendar contest. You can check them out and vote on your favorite here.
Related:
Naomi Oreskes: ‘The verdict is in on climate change’ (Los Angeles Times)
‘Fear of climate change may finally be trumping ideological denial’ (Huffington Post)

plantedcity:

'What do you think our most powerful renewable resource is?' 

This is one of 12 editorial cartoons being considered by the Union of Concerned Scientists in their annual calendar contest. You can check them out and vote on your favorite here.

Related:

(via climate-changing)

climate-changing:

climateadaptation:

"Both the US National Academy of Sciences and the American Association for the Advancement of Science use the word “consensus” when describing the state of climate science.
And yet a social consensus on climate change does not exist. Surveys show that the American public’s belief in the science of climate change has mostly declined over the past five years, with large percentages of the population remaining skeptical of the science. Belief declined from 71 percent to 57 percent between April 2008 and October 2009, according to an October 2009 Pew Research Center poll; more recently, belief rose to 62 percent, according to a February 2012 report by the National Survey of American Public Opinion on Climate Change. Such a significant number of dissenters tells us that we do not have a set of socially accepted beliefs on climate change—beliefs that emerge, not from individual preferences, but from societal norms; beliefs that represent those on the political left, right, and center as well as those whose cultural identifications are urban, rural, religious, agnostic, young, old, ethnic, or racial.
Why is this so”
“Climate Science as a Culture War" - a fantastic survey of the American-centric cultural distinctions surrounding climate change. Via Standford Social Innovation Review

Climate change has nothing to do with belief. It just happens right under our eyes. Beleive it or not!
Consensus is not whath matters in science. It’s about truth!

climate-changing:

climateadaptation:

"Both the US National Academy of Sciences and the American Association for the Advancement of Science use the word “consensus” when describing the state of climate science.

And yet a social consensus on climate change does not exist. Surveys show that the American public’s belief in the science of climate change has mostly declined over the past five years, with large percentages of the population remaining skeptical of the science. Belief declined from 71 percent to 57 percent between April 2008 and October 2009, according to an October 2009 Pew Research Center poll; more recently, belief rose to 62 percent, according to a February 2012 report by the National Survey of American Public Opinion on Climate Change. Such a significant number of dissenters tells us that we do not have a set of socially accepted beliefs on climate change—beliefs that emerge, not from individual preferences, but from societal norms; beliefs that represent those on the political left, right, and center as well as those whose cultural identifications are urban, rural, religious, agnostic, young, old, ethnic, or racial.

Why is this so”

Climate Science as a Culture War" - a fantastic survey of the American-centric cultural distinctions surrounding climate change. Via Standford Social Innovation Review

Climate change has nothing to do with belief. It just happens right under our eyes. Beleive it or not!

Consensus is not whath matters in science. It’s about truth!

ecowatchorg:

Study Links Bee-Killing Pesticides to Decline in Bird Populations
In addition to previous research on the direct impacts of pesticides on pollinators and other beneficials, a recent study published by Dutch scientists establishes an additional indirect link between neonicotinoid use and insect-eating birds.
SEE MORE:
http://ecowatch.com/2014/07/11/pesticides-linked-decline-bird-populations/

ecowatchorg:

Study Links Bee-Killing Pesticides to Decline in Bird Populations

In addition to previous research on the direct impacts of pesticides on pollinators and other beneficials, a recent study published by Dutch scientists establishes an additional indirect link between neonicotinoid use and insect-eating birds.

SEE MORE:

http://ecowatch.com/2014/07/11/pesticides-linked-decline-bird-populations/

That sounds like the worst idea for our food supply right now.

climateadaptation:

Journalists with the BBC (British Broadcasting Corporation) ordered to reflect consensus/majority view of the scientific community. This means climate deniers and other non-qualified persons will not be given airtime.

Often, science content is presented as an issue having “two-sides.” This works when science is unclear (such as the benefits/risks of drinking coffee, or when journalists present the latest super-diet food craze). But, when the majority of scientists agree on a matter, such as climate change (97%), the BBC will no longer present “the other side” on equal grounds.

climateadaptation:

evilsoutherngentleman:

theblogthatneversleeps:

Barack Obama has attained a level of sassiness one can only dream of.

Holy shit it’s real.

Wow. That sassiness is just fantastic. 

evilsoutherngentleman:

theblogthatneversleeps:

Barack Obama has attained a level of sassiness one can only dream of.

Holy shit it’s real.

Wow. That sassiness is just fantastic. 

(via cognitivedissonance)