"

It was hard for early naturalists to imagine that the passenger pigeon could ever become extinct. But they didn’t realize that a technological revolution was about to hit.

"The telegraph allowed word to go out: ‘The pigeons are here,’" says David Blockstein, a senior scientist at the National Council for Science and the Environment and a founder of Project Passenger Pigeon. Thousands of hunters would then jump on newly built trains to ride out to wherever the pigeons had settled and start slaughtering them.

The hunters weren’t just killing the birds to feed their families, however. Pigeons would be stuffed into barrels and loaded back onto the trains, which would deliver them to distant cities, where they’d be sold everywhere from open air markets to fine restaurants. “Technology enabled the market,” says Blockstein.

Soon this technology-driven slaughter was decimating the passenger pigeon. Its decline was so worrisome that Congress passed the Lacey Act, one of the first laws to protect wildlife in the United States. The Lacey Act would eventually help protect many species, but for the passenger pigeon it came too late.

In 1900, the year in which the act was made into law, naturalists spotted a single wild passenger pigeon in Ohio. They never saw another one in the wild again.

For the next 14 years, the species clung to existence in a few zoos. But the birds proved to be poor breeders in captivity. Martha, the last of her kind, was barren.

"

Century After Extinction, Passenger Pigeons Remain Iconic—And Scientists Hope to Bring Them Back (via dendroica)

(via cognitivedissonance)

A young lady walks by, who you find sexually attractive. You’re probably not clever enough to come up with an original thought, so the only remaining option is to yell out at her, like you are not a smart person. Should you do it?

By Shea StraussAUGUST 24, 2014

http://www.playboy.com/articles/should-you-catcall-her-flowchart

A young lady walks by, who you find sexually attractive. You’re probably not clever enough to come up with an original thought, so the only remaining option is to yell out at her, like you are not a smart person. Should you do it?

By Shea StraussAUGUST 24, 2014

http://www.playboy.com/articles/should-you-catcall-her-flowchart

swarleyu:

emilyclocke:

ivadoesnthaveafuckingtumblr:

naturepunk:

Is this Canada? This seems like Canada. 

This could have gone so wrong

Nothing goes wrong in Canada

Even if it did we all have free health care

swarleyu:

emilyclocke:

ivadoesnthaveafuckingtumblr:

naturepunk:

Is this Canada? This seems like Canada. 

This could have gone so wrong

Nothing goes wrong in Canada

Even if it did we all have free health care

(Source: ForGIFs.com, via sensiblestupidity)

greenthepress:

The “urban heat island” effect  (where urban areas are far hotter than their surroundings) probably affects the place you live, and is only going to get worse from climate change.

Climate Central has the facts on how the heat island affects the major cities in the U.S., like New York — 20 degrees hotter than its subarbs!

Read more

(via ethiopienne)

coalashchronicles:

Excerpt:

Check that out. That’s an idyllic little town setting, isn’t it? All crops and and trees and nicely manicured lawns and is that a diner? Just lovely. It’s what the Tennessee Valley Authority promised Uniontown, Alabama, would happen when the local landfill, run by a company called Arrowhead, agreed to take the toxic coal ash from the largest coal ash spill ever in the United States. That happened up the road in Harriman, Tennessee, in 2008, and it just fucked things up for the white, middle-class people in that suburb of Knoxville. So they made a deal to tote the shit down the road, to Uniontown, which is almost 90% black.

Yes, it’s that blatant.

mothernaturenetwork:

100 years later, the passenger pigeon still haunts usThe birds once flocked by the billions in eastern North America, but now they’re just a memory. The last one died Sept. 1, 1914, making this Sept. 1 the 100th anniversary of the species’ extinction.

It was the human that started it. One crazy fast species collapse. 

mothernaturenetwork:

100 years later, the passenger pigeon still haunts us
The birds once flocked by the billions in eastern North America, but now they’re just a memory. The last one died Sept. 1, 1914, making this Sept. 1 the 100th anniversary of the species’ extinction.

It was the human that started it. One crazy fast species collapse. 

(via treehugger)

sensiblestupidity:

fastcompany:

No More Training Wheels: This Bike For Kids Just Won’t Fall Over

At first glance, the Jyrobike looks a little like magic: Give it a push down the sidewalk, and it rolls along by itself, staying completely upright. The secret is a quickly-spinning disc inside the front wheel, which uses gyroscopic force to automatically balance the small bike whenever it starts to wobble.

Read More>

Kids these days, ey?

Training wheels are the worst and make many kids nervous at the continuous wobble of the bike. THIS IS BRILLIANT! Biking is the best. 

"I was defeated by facts"

— ~ D.R. Tucker, conservative author and talk show host who changed his mind on climate change science, as reported in Slate’s “Do Climate Skeptics Change Their Minds?” (via climateadaptation)

(via climate-changing)

Tags: comic

HAHAHAHAHAH

HAHAHAHAHAH

(Source: aneaarthlycivilization, via climate-changing)

awesome.

(Source: thisbigcity)

climateadaptation:

Via The Guardian

Where is everyone going?

Where is everyone going?

Sun Valley Id is having the coldest August… just about ever. I spoke to a couple who has lived here for 40+ years yesterday and he couldn’t stop saying that it has NEVER rained this much in August, or probably ever during summer before. 
So last summer has a massive forest fire that evacuates town and then this summer snow on the mountains as of August with rain storms every single day. (And.. already 40degrees every night.. feels like fall.)
.. 
Climate change is blatantly obvious. 
But I am really enjoying seeing snow on the peaks… 

Sun Valley Id is having the coldest August… just about ever. I spoke to a couple who has lived here for 40+ years yesterday and he couldn’t stop saying that it has NEVER rained this much in August, or probably ever during summer before. 

So last summer has a massive forest fire that evacuates town and then this summer snow on the mountains as of August with rain storms every single day. (And.. already 40degrees every night.. feels like fall.)

.. 

Climate change is blatantly obvious. 

But I am really enjoying seeing snow on the peaks…